Not the triumph but the struggle.

Bass, Amy. Not the Triumph but the Struggle: The 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 2002.

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Not the Triumph but the StruggleThe 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete

not the triumph but the struggle

12/29/03 "The most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well." - Pierre de Courbertin

12/17/03 "The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep, and miles to go before I sleep." - Robert Frost

Not the Triumph but the Struggle - AbeBooks

"The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well."

It’s not the triumph but the struggle. Not to have conquerod but to have fought well.
The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered, but to have fought well. —The Olympic Creed, 1896Pierre de Coubertin was also responsible for the Olympic Creed. His inspiration for the creed was a speech given by Bishop Ethelbert Talbot at a service for Olympic champions during the 1908 Olympic Games. The Olympic Creed reads: “The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well.”In her excellent new book, Not the Triumph but the Struggle, author Amy Bass uses the famous ‘black power’ podium salute by sprinters John Carlos and Tommie Smith as the centerpiece of her expansive examination of the black athlete in America.Until recently, Berlin (1936, Hitler's Games) and Munich (1972, the Black September terrorist attack) have generated the bulk of Olympics-related literature. Mexico City is gaining ground, jump-started by two academic-press books this decade: Amy Bass' "Not the Triumph but the Struggle: The 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete" and Douglas Hartmann's "Race, Culture, and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic Protests and Their Aftermath." Both Smith ("Silent Gesture") and Carlos ("Why?") have also written autobiographies.
Not the Triumph but the Struggle: The 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete. Bass, Amy

Not the triumph but the struggle

"Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure . . . than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."Theodore Roosevelt

"The important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, the important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well. To spread these precepts is to build up a stronger and more valiant and, above all, more scrupulous and more generous humanity. "Pierre De Coubertin

W2 Stadium | not the triumph but the struggle

Citius, Altius, Fortius – The Olympic motto, Latin for "Swifter, Higher, Stronger". In the true spirit of sportsmanship, fair play, friendship and peace, each student participating in the WASC Olympic Games takes the Olympic oath to impress upon the Olympic creed, which is that the most important thing in the WASC Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered but to have fought well.

Not the Triumph but the Struggle The 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete |

JSTOR: Not the Triumph but the Struggle, March 2004

In her excellent new book, Not the Triumph but the Struggle, author Amy Bass uses the famous ‘black power’ podium salute by sprinters John Carlos and Tommie Smith as the centerpiece of her expansive examination of the black athlete in America.