Is mall culture capturing India? - India Business Blog

As malls evolve by the day to keep the customer coming back for more, we take a close look at the new trends that are coming up in the mall space- how malls are fighting challenges like e-retail and how services are seen occupying more space. Here's a look at the changing mall culture in India.

Chakresh Mishra - Mall culture in India : Features

Chakresh Mishra in his article Mall Culture in India: Features defines a shopping mall.

1419 Words Essay on Retail Trade and Mall Culture in India

As we get excited with new wave mall culture in India, getting stuck in fancy food courts and addicted to unhealthy junk food, we forget the glorious past of eating together in markets and sharing our friendships and values in the openness of a market.

Mall Culture in India during Recession - Paggu

This article begins with understanding the new mall culture in India. It then explores from the past the bazaar culture that has always been a part of life in India. Thereafter, it turns to the world of form and design, arguing that a clearer understanding of and deliberate choice of certain designs and patterns can more suitably engage the Indian consumer, offering both social anchor and a lively consumer experience.

Emergence of Mall Culture in India
While the mall culture in India is surely rising, the moot question is, how many of them succeed in what they set out for. As organised retailing in India grows, tier II and tier III cities, especially, are seeing hectic activity in the mall space.With the endeavour to influence lifestyles, K Raheja Corp has also successfully ventured into retail development with Inorbit Malls. Pioneering the mall culture in India, the world class malls offer an amalgamation of fashion, lifestyle, food and entertainment, delivering to families an exceptional entertainment destination. Footwear is not only a key factor in fashion and style, but a necessity as well. While some buy shoes based on functionality, for others it’s aesthetic and trends that help them decide. Before the explosion of mall culture in India, an average Indian could name only three to four shoe brands here like Bata, Khadims, Ajanta and Paragon. Buying trends were focused more on functionality and branded shoes as style statement was an alien concept.
Here's a look at the changing mall culture in India.

This article begins with understanding the new mall culture in India

Destination retail could also come from the presence of exclusive brands on a particular high street, as opposed to brands that are omnipresent. A few high streets may have exclusive stores such as the Kalaniketan, Amarsons, Premsons, Akbarally's, Millionaire etc. - legacy stores (housing premium brands) with a loyal clientele which has existed well before the mall culture arrived in India. Being less omnipresent and the fact that they offer exclusive collections make such stores attractive to discerning customers.

Plaza, Chennai, the mall culture in India took off only after the year 2000

Increasing mall culture in India

Mall culture in India and especially in Delhi & NCR has grown with an incredible pace. Just a few years back, people had to make a choice among shopping, movies or hanging out on a holiday but thanks to our malls, all these jobs can be performed at the same time, under the same roof and that too with a wonderful experience. And it is basically the experience and not the intention that counts when it comes to malls.

The emergence of the mall culture in India is a sign of positive development.

Chakresh Mishra - Mall culture in India : Effects

While the mall culture in India is surely rising, the moot question is, how many of them succeed in what they set out for. As organised retailing in India grows, tier II and tier III cities, especially, are seeing hectic activity in the mall space. The , which is the fifth largest retail destination globally, has been ranked as the most attractive emerging market for investment in the retail sector, by AT Kearney’s eighth annual Global Retail Development Index (GRDI), in 2009. The share of retail trade in the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) was between eight to 10 per cent, in 2007. It is currently around 12 per cent and is likely to reach 22 per cent, by 2010.