CBC ARCHIVES: Canadians storm Juno Beach on D-Day

Although a total of 14,000 Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day, there were not more than three thousand young Canadians in the first wave - all ranks. The initial assault was the responsibility of four regiments with two additional companies supporting the flanks:

The cruiser HMS Belfast bombarding Juno Beach on D-Day

British commandos scramble ashore from their landing craft on Juno Beach on D-Day.

guarded by Canadian troops on Juno Beach on D-Day

BERNIERES SUR MER Canadian troops going ashore on Juno Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944. (Photo : Conseil Régional de Basse-Normandie / Archives Nationales du CANADA )

Stuart with Len Smith who landed on Juno Beach on D-Day

As Canadians, my wife and I were quite disturbed to learn that an offshore wind farm is being proposed for construction near the French town of Courseulles-sur-mer, where the Canadians landed at Juno Beach on D-Day.

Canadian forces unload LCI on the beach during high tide. Sector of Juno Beach on D-Day June 6, 1944.
Fourteen thousand young Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day. Their courage, determination and self-sacrifice were the immediate reasons for the success in those critical hours. The fighting they endured was fierce and frightening. The price they paid was high - the battles for the beachhead cost 340 Canadian lives and another 574 wounded. John Keegan, eminent British historian who wrote Six Armies in Normandy, stated the following concerning the Canadian 3rd Division on D-Day: “At the end of the day, its forward elements stood deeper into France than those of any other division. The opposition the Canadians faced was stronger than that of any other beach save Omaha. That was an accomplishment in which the whole nation could take considerable pride.”Fourteen thousand young Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day. Their courage, determination and self-sacrifice were the immediate reasons for the success in those critical hours. The fighting they endured was fierce and frightening. The price they paid was high - the battles for the beachhead cost 340 Canadian lives and another 574 wounded. John Keegan, eminent British historian who wrote Six Armies in Normandy, stated the following concerning the Canadian 3rd Division on D-Day: “At the end of the day, its forward elements stood deeper into France than those of any other division. The opposition the Canadians faced was stronger than that of any other beach save Omaha. That was an accomplishment in which the whole nation could take considerable pride.”The 9th Brigade consisting of the Highland Light Infantry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, and North Nova Scotia Highlanders regiments landed later in the morning and advanced through the lead brigades. The Sherbrooke Fusiliers tanks (27th Armoured Regiment) provided tank support.

Although a total of 14,000 Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day, there were not more than three thousand young Canadians in the first wave - all ranks. The initial assault was the responsibility of four regiments with two additional companies supporting the flanks:
- North Shore Regiment on the left at St. Aubin (Nan Red beach)
- Queen's Own Rifles in the centre at Bernières (Nan White beach)
- Regina Rifles at Courseulles (Nan Green beach)
- Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the western edge of Courseulles (Mike Red and Mike Green beaches)
- a company of the Canadian Scottish secured the right flank
- a company of British, Royal Marine Commandos secured the left flank
BERNIERES SUR MER Canadian troops going ashore on Juno Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944

My Father was 18 years old when he hit Juno beach on D-Day

Back in the British sector, 21,400 troops landed on Juno beach on D-Day, but only six of 40 landing craft with artillery on board arrived - the rest capsized. The infantry arrived ahead of the supporting DD tanks but the Canadians pressed on, avoiding pockets of German resistance and, as the plan demanded, pushed on inland.

The town of Courseulles-sur-Mer honors the Canadian forces which landed at Juno Beach on D-Day

JUNO Beach on D-Day - D-Day Museum and Overlord Embroidery

Pat Churchill, 90, pictured with his wife Karin, 84, wave goodbye to the south coast of England. Mr Churchill was with the 2nd Royal Marines Armoured Support Regiment which landed on Juno Beach on D-Day

Canadian soldiers from 9th Brigade land at Juno Beach on D-Day Photo: STF/AFP/Getty Images

A Tale of Six Scaffolding Poles: Juno Beach on D-Day Tony Lowndes

The 9th Brigade consisting of the Highland Light Infantry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, and North Nova Scotia Highlanders regiments landed later in the morning and advanced through the lead brigades. The Sherbrooke Fusiliers tanks (27th Armoured Regiment) provided tank support.

Although a total of 14,000 Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day, there were not more than three thousand young Canadians in the first wave - all ranks. The initial assault was the responsibility of four regiments with two additional companies supporting the flanks:
- North Shore Regiment on the left at St. Aubin (Nan Red beach)
- Queen's Own Rifles in the centre at Bernières (Nan White beach)
- Regina Rifles at Courseulles (Nan Green beach)
- Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the western edge of Courseulles (Mike Red and Mike Green beaches)
- a company of the Canadian Scottish secured the right flank
- a company of British, Royal Marine Commandos secured the left flank