Janna Malamud Smith, My Father is a Book: A Memoir of Bernard Malamud

“My Father is a Book,” a reading from the Threepenny Review essay. Janna Malamud Smith is a writer and psychotherapist. She is the author of three books, (1997), (2003), and (2006). Her articles and essays have appeared nationally and internationally in newspapers, magazines and literary journals including , , , and . Ms. Smith was born in Corvallis, Oregon, and, after moving east as a nine-year-old, lived briefly in Vermont before settling in the Boston area. She studied American History and Literature in college, and then pursued a graduate degree in clinical social work. Smith continues to work part-time as a clinical social worker, mostly now teaching psychotherapy in a hospital-based department of psychiatry, as well as in private practice. She is married, and the mother of two sons.

Janna Malamud Smith is the author of the 2004 book, “.”

BETWEEN THE LINES WITH JANNA MALAMUD SMITH OF MOTHERHOOD AND ITS UNEXPLORED SHADOWS

My Father Is a Book by Janna Malamud Smith

...MILTON -- It was her father's death that forced Janna Malamud Smith to consider the issue of privacy seriously -- not...the Personal Life," that she be identified as "Janna Malamud Smith." Otherwise, she is Janna Smith in her professional......Continue reading about

The website maintained by the author Janna Malamud Smith.

Janna Malamud Smith is a writer and psychotherapist. She is the author of four books, , , , and . Her articles and essays have appeared nationally and internationally in newspapers, magazines and literary journals including , , , , , and .

Janna Malamud Smith: We need an independent agency to govern our privacy rights. (zigazou76/Flickr)
Janna Malamud Smith is a writer and psychotherapist and the author of Private Matters: In Defense of the Personal Life; A Potent Spell; and My Father Is a Book: A Memoir of Bernard Malamud. Her essay in the Spring 2008 SCHOLAR, "," was published in Best American Essays 2009.The title of Janna Malamud Smith's "A Potent Spell: Mother Love and the Power of Fear" comes from Euripides' "Iphigenia at Aulis": "Oh what a power is......Continue reading about To the literary world, Janna Malamud Smith is the daughter of the novelist and short story writer Bernard Malamud, whose work along with that of Saul Bellow, Isaac Singer, Phillip Roth, Grace Paley, and others, established not only a powerful strain of Jewish American fiction following the Second World War, but a significant body of work that reinvigorated all of American literature in the latter half of the twentieth century. And to a number of folks here in Corvallis, Janna Malamud Smith is still that little girl who grew up in a neighborhood over near the old Harding school. Her mother was active in the community and maintained life-long friendships here and helped establish a wonderful scholarship for undergraduates in the English department that has benefited numerous students for years of which we are very grateful. And her father taught composition courses over in a quonset hut on the campus of Oregon State College. ...eloquent book by explaining a radical change of heart she underwent over the past decade and a half. In 1989, Janna Malamud Smith believed so strongly in the right to privacy, she published an article in the New York Times Book Review outlining......Continue reading about Malamud, in his daughter's eyes; Janna Malamud Smith tells about life with her father, writer Bernard Malamud.(FEATURES)(BOOKS)(Book Review)...Private Matters: In Defense of the Personal Life, by Janna Malamud Smith (Addison-Wesley, $22). Growing up with a famous father (Bernard Malamud), Janna Malamud Smith came face-to-face early on with the issue of......Continue reading about
Janna Malamud Smith.

Janna Malamud Smith is on Facebook

Janna Malamud Smith’s “Shipwrecked” was a fresh take on an old subject, which reminded me of something I’d heard once: write something new in an old way or something old in a new way. The loss in our lives continues to be fodder for the page, our way of working through important moments, all the grandmother essays we see in intro courses—but I really appreciated the shipwrecked metaphor she uses.

At what point does a parent stop worrying about their child? Janna Malamud Smith says, don't hold your breath. (London Scout/ Unsplash)

The American Scholar: Shipwrecked - Janna Malamud Smith

Janna Malamud Smith is a psychotherapist and writer. Her latest book is “An Absorbing Errand: How Artists and Craftsmen Make Their Way to Mastery.”

Janna Malamud Smith

Janna Malamud Smith is a psychotherapist and writer

Janna Malamud Smith is a psychotherapist and writer. Her latest book is “An Absorbing Errand: How Artists and Craftsmen Make Their Way to Mastery.”